As an undergraduate at Cornell University, I started on a winding research path that took me from behavioral research on domestic dog urinary behavior to kinematic video analysis of common eider duck predator-escape behaviors. Studying eider ducks involved small-boat fieldwork in the waters surrounding Shoals Marine Laboratory, a first for me and the start of an eventual fascination with the marine environment and those species that move and live within it. After graduating, I moved on to West Chester University and a masters degree with Dr. Frank Fish working on the anatomical structure of dolphin tail flukes. During this time, I also assisted with an Office of Naval Research Multi-University Research Initiative (MURI) grant project studying the physics of dolphin movement. In my current role as a PhD candidate working with Dr. Jeremy Goldbogen at Stanford University’s Hopkins Marine Station, I have been able to integrate my experience with marine mammals, my love of animal movement, and my passion for the marine environment into a project focusing on the swimming performance and feeding efficiency of large whales ranging in body size across an order of magnitude.

Whales

Whales